Transport Accessibility in Auckland

Measuring accessibility There is a subtle difference between transit accessibility and the accessibilities provided by other transportation modes. The main difference of transit accessibility is in its schedule. While travel time to/from transport and in-vehicle time is common between car and transit, the real test of freedom in transit relies on its spontaneity. Frequency has …

A Critical Review of Social Justice Theories in Public Transit Planning

One of the most common areas in public transit planning that has been under investigation is the inclusion of “social justice”. In its simplest form, social justice demands more equitable access for all residents to resources that are provided by a city. However, public transit plans are typically guided by maximising tangible measures such as …

Fixing the reliability issue of public transport in Auckland: A short term solution.

Introduction Bus service, especially in busy urban areas, is facing the challenge to enhance its reliability. Studies have revealed that unreliability can seriously undermine the attractiveness of bus service (Lin et al., 2008). Hence, most transit agencies have monitored service reliability as one of the key performance measures for their bus operations (Benn and Barton-Aschman, 1995). …

Evaluating Spatial Justice in Rail Transit: Access to Terminals by Foot

There has been a growing interest to improve urban rail services for increasing a city’s economic competitiveness. While accessibility provided by rail services has been the focus of many studies, determining accessibility to rail stations is less investigated. The present study examines how accessibility to rail stations via walking has social justice implications. Accessibility can …

Transport Accessibility and Mode Shift

Introduction Aucklanders are heavily reliant on their cars to meet their travel needs with more than 80% of daily trips being made by cars. However, the high socio-economic costs of private cars such as congestion, poor quality urban environments, pollution and carbon emissions, poor public health and high travel costs to name a few, have …

Justice in public transport systems: A comparative study of Auckland, Brisbane, Perth and Vancouver

Although the concept of social justice seems to be ubiquitous in most transportation plans, methods adopted to evaluate transit systems have little engagement with political theories to define justice. Without a proper definition, transport planners will be unable to design transit systems that achieve justice. The present study proposes a combination of sufficientarianism and egalitarianism …

Right to the city: Applying justice tests to public transport investments

Many policy-makers are grappling with the twin challenges posed by growing travel demands and persistent socioeconomic inequality. To address these issues, numerous studies propose and apply “justice tests”, which relate the effects of transport policies to prevailing socioeconomic deprivation. While the theoretical foundations of justice tests are well-established, there exists less agreement on methodological aspects …

Car, transit, or bicycle who wins in a March Madness race?

I recently saw an article in NZ Herald about a race between 4 people using different transportation modes (car, bus, bicycle, and train) to travel from New Lynn into the city. Google Maps can provide an estimation of travel time for all these modes but the experiment showed the actual travel time can be different. The final …

Justice, the missing piece in the Labour-led government’s transport plan.

Introduction The new Labour-led Government has announced new plans for Auckland’s public transport (PT) network including a multibillion-dollar investment in light rail to the airport and West Auckland. These project has been part of Labour’s transport policies to make “Auckland a world-class city”. In Labour’s transport manifesto, PT is about giving choices to people, having …